1. 906
    Posts

    dear o dear not another extension?? not enough seeing eye dogs??

    3 likes
  2. 2.1k
    Posts

    What extension is that little man? Cut back on the Crack pipe champ.

    2 likes
  3. 906
    Posts

    gold up dud down no surprises //

    1 like
  4. 468
    Posts

    We all working making money and looking at our investments---Living the dream.

    Sandune/Sandunes lost ITS cash and now IT posts garbage day in and day out.

    I lose track of all the trolls- Some were ESI holders, Some were AVQ Holders, Some were MCO holders...

    Bloody hell- Get a life Trolls.

    Lets see if AUL can get profitable and benefit from the high gold prices....For those with no skin in the game- get a job and a life....Maybe just maybe you can spend your time researching you next stock to BUY yourself....

    Imagine that...

    2 likes
  5. 906
    Posts

    gold up dud down ..as usual .. keep working your investment is a dud imo look at TMRC in US near 5 bagged while AUL keeps testing near all time lows ..mkt tells you imo

    1 like
  6. 2.1k
    Posts

    Great timing AUL.

    Superb job by mgmt since the deadwood was removed in 2016.

    3 likes
  7. 906
    Posts

    great job diluted the s$it out of shareholders have stock at near all time lows ..well done

    2 likes
  8. 906
    Posts

    still waiting for 1.8 by xmas 2018 LOL delusional..never happen

    2 likes
  9. 906
    Posts

    It’s a deathtrap': 11 years after Black Saturday, hills set to burn
    Our coverage of the bushfire crisis is free for all readers. Please consider supporting our journalism with a subscription.
    Liam Mannix
    By Liam Mannix
    January 6, 2020 — 11.40pm
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    Melbourne's urban fringe is at risk of suffering another catastrophic bushfire with experts warning the trees and undergrowth that have grown back since the 2009 Black Saturday fires are now tinder dry.

    Eleven years after 173 people died when fires ripped through the densely-populated and heavily-forested foothills north-east of Melbourne, emergency experts say the bush has recovered to the point where it will be a genuine fire risk if hot temperatures persist this summer.

    Kinglake West resident Mark Morrow property is still surrounded by dangerous bush
    Kinglake West resident Mark Morrow property is still surrounded by dangerous bushCREDIT:CHRIS HOPKINS

    Former emergency management commissioner Craig Lapsley, who drove through the area a few weeks ago, says that after a hot December it is now ready to burn again.

    “That’s where the bush meets the cities – and the people. When it burns – and it will, because it’s dry enough now - it will cause significant issues,” he said.

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    Mr Lapsley says Monday's drizzle was not enough to add significant moisture to the forests. "It gives us respite," he said. "But the next hot day will burn it all off."

    Government projections show a blaze that gets away in the Warburton Valley, or at Mount Dandenong, could destroy more than 4000 homes – twice as many as were lost on Black Saturday.

    The view from just outside Kinglake. The small town has been rebuilt since Black Saturday - and the forests have grown back.
    The view from just outside Kinglake. The small town has been rebuilt since Black Saturday - and the forests have grown back.CREDIT:CHRIS HOPKINS

    A similar bushfire further to the east would compromise Melbourne’s drinking water supply.

    The projections are contained in the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning's strategic bushfire management plan published in 2015.

    The department has said that since then, bushfire risk in the region has increased to pre-Black Saturday levels.

    “The situation in the last couple of weeks is that things are very dry across the state now,” said Luke Hegarty, a spokesman for the State Control Centre.

    “That will challenge us because a lot of the areas where we did have some of that remaining moisture is really, really quickly disappearing.”

    Authorities are so concerned about the threat to towns in the area, many of which have only a single road in or out, that they ran a mock-evacuation in Powelltown, Three Bridges and Gilderoy late last year, before the fire season began.

    The region typically takes a few months to dry out over summer, reaching peak fire danger in February.

    “It has only now got to the point where it is ready to burn," Mr Lapsley said. "And the drying part of December has taken it there.”

    Former Emergency Commissioner Craig Lapsley, seen here at a news conference in 2018.
    Former Emergency Commissioner Craig Lapsley, seen here at a news conference in 2018.CREDIT:CHRIS HOPKINS

    Mark Morrow lives in Kinglake West where his house, and eight others around it, were lost in 2009 (they have now been rebuilt).

    “If we get another fire now, it’d be just as bad as Black Saturday," he said. "They’ve done no clearing, they’ve done nothing with the undergrowth. I went for a walk through the bush, and it’s just as thick as it was – probably thicker.”

    While the foothills northeast of Melbourne are not as dry as East Gippsland, should a fire begin many more people are likely to be affected.

    “Think about that population," says Mr Lapsley. "You’ve got people who have lived in the city and moved to the bush. It’s had good forest growth. And that growth is now dry."

    Because much of the region’s forest is close to towns, it is extremely difficult to carry out planned burns. Using fire, bulldozers and grass slashing, government agencies have only been able to cut the risk in the region by about 4 per cent.

    "We’re in the grip of a very significant drought event, pretty well in most of the south-eastern half of Victoria," says Dr Jim McLennan, a bushfire safety researcher at La Trobe University.

    "Soils are dry, much dryer than we would expect them to be. The vegetation is dry. There are lots of places where, if a fire started on a bad day ... we’d potentially be in trouble."

    Gary Morgan, Victoria's former chief fire officer, says the risk will continue to grow toward February as the region's mountain ash forests dry out.

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    New permanent bushfire recovery agency for Victoria
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    5:39

    New permanent bushfire recovery agency for Victoria

    The government has pledged $50 million to kickstart the new agency Bushfire Recovery Victoria which will manage recovery in communities now and for future events, using community skills and seeking to rebuild local economies.

    "Once they dry, and when they are ready to be burnt, you have huge fuel loads," he says. "When you have a fire in that forest it is really intense.”

    A fire in east-central Victoria is one of the CFA's nightmare scenarios. Almost 60 per cent of Victoria’s population live there and about half of them live in properties close to bushland. Many are "tree-changers" who are have not seen a bushfire before. It has some of the most flammable vegetation on Earth.

    RELATED ARTICLE
    The Premier Daniel Andrews announced at the State Control Centre that Ken Lay (left) has been appointed as Chair of a newly formed agency the new Bushfire Recovery Victoria. MP Lisa Neville is CENTRE.
    BUSHFIRES
    Victoria fires: all the missing found safe but death toll could rise to three
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    “I drove from Koo Wee Rup up to Launching Place. You look at the houses that are embedded in the bush. In a drought situation, it’s a deathtrap for them, there is nothing else you can say," says retired CSIRO bushfire scientist Phil Cheney.

    More than than half of all Victoria’s bushfire deaths have happened in the region. It burnt on Black Thursday in 1851, Black Friday in 1939, Ash Wednesday in 1983, and Black Saturday in 2009. After 2009 the bushfire risk fell dramatically – because there was little left to burn.

    But the forests have now grown back, reaching the same risk levels as before the huge blaze.

    Large parts of central Victoria – while not in drought – have endured long-term rainfall shortages, according to the Bureau of Meteorology. An extremely hot and dry December was the final touch needed to get them ready to burn.

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    1 like
  10. 2.1k
    Posts

    Why would a poster praying for Victorian gold producer AUL to fail be posting fire updates unless he’s praying for fire in Woods Point?

    You deserve to have your stupid head kicked in you piece of filth.

    1 like
  11. 906
    Posts

    Dud back to all time lows ??

    1 like
  12. 906
    Posts

    go the super dud all were warned..

    1 like
  13. 906
    Posts

    The certainty is that this company with these mines will never make sustainable profits.
    As I’ve said before - the gold endowment is of medium to high grade (MS and A1), Maldon low grade, RoD ? and only lend themselves to hand held mining methods to maximise grade. The shoots are low tonnage and reserve drilling expensive. MS has good prospects at depth but getting there is not an option for this company with their funding limitations.
    I am not a naysayer - merely trying to temper the up ramping by the resident cheerleaders who lack any real mining knowledge. No doubt there will be the sporadic pump and dump.
    I hate seeing mums and dads being led down the garden path.

    2 likes
  14. 16.0k
    Posts

    ###I hate seeing mums and dads being led down the garden path.###

    You forgot while the directors of these dogs are pulling in massive salary each and ever year.

    2 likes
  15. 906
    Posts

    had a CDU and AVQ mine plan .. they both ended well

    1 like
  16. 906
    Posts

    If AULs existing mining prospects were any good, they would just walk away from this dogs breakfast of a deal. But desperate times call for desperate measures so it seems they are pushing ahead in the vain hope that completing the deal may delay the inevitable..............that is AUL finally going to the corporate undertaker. How ironic it will be if Korda Mentha end up as the administrators of AUL.

    1 like
  17. 507
    Posts

    Walk away from a bargain?

  18. 906
    Posts

    Only a bargain for korda..go the dud

    1 like
  19. 2.1k
    Posts

    Aul know exactly how much gold A1 is pouring.

    So do others.

    AUL are in the best position to win the prize. The SP could double on confirmation and still be insanely cheap IMO.

    2 likes
  20. 906
    Posts

    Wont happen..go the dud

    1 like
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