vote 1 labor

  1. 29.0k
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    Better then kill bill

    2 likes
  2. 5.5k
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    The LNP have held office for thirteen of the last seventeen years and in that time drug overdose deaths and Australia's debt have ballooned , kill bill and the greens are not responsible for failed LNP policies .

  3. 3.1k
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    ....god forbid we blame the junkies for their own overdoses

    1 like
  4. 717
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    Overdose.....

    1 like
  5. 5.5k
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    most grannies absolutly trust the medical professionals who get them hooked on prescribed opiates , most opiate overdoses are junkies who get their hillbilly heroin from their local chemist. .

  6. 3.6k
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    Most grannies have health issues, often painful.....As my GP explained - I am 66 years old and I have the issues I would expect....but doing very very well at my age.......So I don't get the opiods, yet....Marines are tough - I can take a significant bit of pain...Pain is good..I love pain.....It toughens the soul........But I am prescribed Naproxen daily...and very low dose Valium before bed.....It works fine......I told the doc that is more than fine for me.....I am pleased with it.....

    Still good to go....for kicking ass on the left mongrels....I have skill levels those left turds have no concept of........Anytime - career Centrelink faggots - I am happy to ruin your day....As it is written - so shall it be.......

    1 like
  7. 5.5k
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    Naproxen is a pharmaceutical psychoactive drug that has some serious side effects and has the potential to cause psychosis , my mate has brain trauma from having the crap kicked out of him a few years ago and that poor bastard is now a Valium junkie who is off with the pixies 24/7. . As for kicking ass you use it or you lose it I can still throw a 100 punches in under thirty five seconds with one hand .

  8. 29.0k
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    NSW Labor crisis so great Albanese may need to call in administrators
    The troubles in the NSW Labor Party, which has engulfed Sam Dastyari, left, and now Kaila Murnain, right, is so great that it might be time for Anthony Albanese to call in the administrators.
    The troubles in the NSW Labor Party, which has engulfed Sam Dastyari, left, and now Kaila Murnain, right, is so great that it might be time for Anthony Albanese to call in the administrators.
    ANDREW CLENNELL
    NSW POLITICAL EDITOR
    @aclennell

    AN HOUR AGO AUGUST 29, 2019
    77 COMMENTS
    The crisis in the NSW Labor Party is so great that it might be time that Anthony Albanese called in the administrators.

    What has unfolded with ICAC is the tale of a party branch run by kids who clearly never learned about consequences and who were ill-equipped to run the biggest branch of one of the two biggest political parties in the land.

    Put there by svengalis who wanted to retain their own influence, the likes of Sam Dastyari (appointed at 26), Kaila Murnain (at 29) and Jamie Clements have all miserably failed the party.

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    MORE: Murnain breaks down at ICAC

    Now, the person being pumped up by many as the new broom is Dastyari’s groomsman, union official Bob Nanva.

    Nanva supporters say he is “not like the rest of the crew” but who can be convinced after what has played out at ICAC?

    The fact that “Dasher” Dastyari still had a say in party matters having already quit the federal frontbench in disgrace over a China donations scandal says it all.

    “Albo” has so far been silent amid the scandal. It is now time that he condemns those involved (uncomfortable given Dastyari and Murnain backed him into the top job even though he was from the Left) just as Jodi McKay has.

    But what is also clearly needed is a proper restructure of NSW Labor; not just another review which finds for keeping the car the same but changing a couple of tyres.

    Dastyari rang me this morning and said it was clear he was put into the job of general secretary “too young” and it should have occurred when he was 40 and he should have been in parliament at 50.

    Actually, it’s clear he should have been nowhere near positions of power in either institution.

    It’s true what they say in Labor - that the Liberals hid their own hundreds of thousands of illegal donations through organisations like the Free Enterprise Foundation and a couple of their MPs copped cash in a Bentley - all exposed at ICAC in 2014.

    But one of the amazing things about this inquiry is that it was one year after the ICAC hearings into the Libs that the cash in the Aldi bag incident occurred.

    Labor head officials knew that you could be busted for that sort of thing yet they still allowed it. As if it was something that always happened.

  9. 7.2k
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    I would like to ask the ALP/How do you sack the Boss?
    And whom exactly did sack the Boss?

    Any guts? Answer.

  10. 717
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    Sack the boss, ........alp got no king

  11. 717
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    Shorten take top job........or rudd

  12. 29.0k
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    New Hope to sack workers if Acland mine not approved
    Mark Ludlow
    Mark Ludlow
    Queensland Bureau Chief
    Aug 30, 2019 — 4.30pm

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    Mining company New Hope Group said it would sack half the workforce at its New Acland coal mine on Monday unless it received final approvals from the Queensland government.

    After more than 12 years stuck in planning limbo and in the courts, the company has ramped up its threats saying 150 workers will lose their jobs unless it can proceed with the $900 million stage three expansion of the New Acland mine, west of Brisbane.

    Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk is under pressure to approve New Acland mine. AAP

    In a game of high-stakes corporate gamesmanship, New Acland Coal general manager Dave O'Dwyer said the redundancies would go ahead unless the Palaszczuk Labor government granted the stage three mining leases, an associated water licence and approval to continue to use the Jondaryan rail facility.

    "It's astounding we've heard nothing from the Palaszczuk government. It's obvious in the eyes of the Premier, the New Acland Coal workforce doesn't matter," Mr O'Dwyer said.

    Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and Mines Minister Anthony Lynham would not comment on Friday.

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    The Palaszczuk government has had an uneasy history with approving coal mines in recent years, even though the ALP passed a motion backing the coal industry at its recent party conference.

    A go-slow on approving Adani's controversial $2 billion Carmichael mine badly backfired in the May federal election when Labor lost all its federal representatives outside of south-east Queensland.

    A dramatic back-flip after election day paved the way for the Adani mine to be approved in June.

    Like the Adani mine, the New Acland mine has also been bogged down in the courts, with both environmentalists and local farmers challenging the stage three expansion.

    A 'bizarre decision'
    High-profile critics of the mine have included Sydney radio host Alan Jones, who grew up in the agricultural region, near Toowoomba.

    The project received a new lease of life in May after the Queensland Supreme Court overturned an earlier ruling which recommended the Palaszczuk government oppose the mine.

    A green light for the expansion of the New Acland mine, which is due to shut in 2020, would extend the life of the mine at Oakey for another decade until 2031, increasing production from about 4.6 million tonnes a year to 7.6 million tonnes a year.

    It comes as the resources sector warned about a precedent being set by NSW's Independent Planning Commission approving a coal mine on the proviso it only exports to countries that are party to the Paris climate agreement or have a similar plan to bring down carbon emissions.

    Glencore said it was still poring over the decision which gave conditional approval to the Glencore-Peabody $381 million United Wambo project in the Hunter Valley which will expand an existing open-cut mining operation and develop a new open-cut mine to extract an additional 150 million tonnes of coal for the next 20 years.

    Under the approval, Glencore-Peabody would have to gain approval for which countries it can export coal in an attempt to control scope three emissions (or the emissions from the customers who bought the coal).

    There are 182 countries who are party to the Paris agreement who could receive coal from the United Wambo project, including Japan, China, South Korea, India and Vietnam.

    But Taiwan, a potential export country for the project, has not signed up to the Paris climate agreement, but the IPC noted it "does have domestic policies to reduce GHGEs [greenhouse gas emissions]."

    Lawyers for Glencore are working through the 120-page agreement to see whether it can be practicably implemented, including tracking emissions from coal sold to a third party.

    NSW Minerals Council chief executive Stephen Galilee said while the industry supported Australia's commitment to the Paris agreement, it didn't support the conditions imposed on it about scope three emissions.

    "The condition is out of step with other jurisdictions, and also contrary to agreed international protocols for accounting for greenhouse gases, so we will continue to seek policy clarity from the NSW government on this issue," Mr Galilee said.

    Queensland Resources Council chief executive and former federal resources minister Ian Macfarlane said it was a "bizarre decision" which was beyond the remit of what you expect from a planning authority.

    "This is an approval authority dictating climate change policy in Australia," he said.

    "And in doing so they are putting at risk not only jobs in the Hunter Valley, but also they are showing no regard for a national approach to reducing carbon emissions. This sets a dangerous precedent."

    Earlier this year the NSW Land and Environment Court rejected Gloucester Resources' Rocky Hill coal mine partly because of the carbon emissions it would emit and the impact on climate change.

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  13. 29.0k
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    Former Labor MP accused of lying to ICAC over donation
    By Tom Rabe and Kate McClymont
    August 30, 2019 — 11.41am
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    A former NSW MP has been accused of lying to a corruption inquiry over his alleged role in organising for a Chinese billionaire to pay $100,000 for dinner with then-federal and state Labor leaders Bill Shorten and Luke Foley.

    The table at dinner was allegedly purchased by billionaire property developer Huang Xiangmo in March 2015, who the inquiry has been told later delivered the cash in an Aldi shopping bag to NSW Labor's headquarters in Sydney.

    Labor's 2015 fundraising dinner at the Emperor's Garden Restaurant in Chinatown. Pictured are Ernest Wong, second from left; Bill Shorten, third from left; Huang Xiangmo, second from right; and Luke Foley, far right.
    Labor's 2015 fundraising dinner at the Emperor's Garden Restaurant in Chinatown. Pictured are Ernest Wong, second from left; Bill Shorten, third from left; Huang Xiangmo, second from right; and Luke Foley, far right.

    The Independent Commission Against Corruption on Friday was shown evidence that then-NSW Labor MP Ernest Wong sent an email claiming the head table of a Chinese Friends of Labor fundraising dinner had been "taken for $100k".

    Mr Wong, who earlier denied claiming the head table was sold, was accused by counsel assisting the commission Scott Robertson of giving false evidence.

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    "Sorry that the head table has already been taken for $100k. There are [sic] still one $5000 table with federal shadow minister and one $2000 with state shadow minister left and a few $800 ones up for [sic] grasp," Mr Wong said in a March 3 email shown to the ICAC.

    Former NSW MP Ernest Wong arrives at the Independent Commission Against Corruption on Friday.
    Former NSW MP Ernest Wong arrives at the Independent Commission Against Corruption on Friday.CREDIT:RENEE NOWYTARGER

    Mr Robertson asked: "You did sell the head table, you sold it to Mr Huang and you sold it for a sum like $100,000, do you accept that?"

    "No," Mr Wong replied.

    Mr Robertson alleged Mr Wong's evidence was not only wrong, it was "knowingly false".

    "Because when you answered that question that I sought to put to you multiple times, you first sought to evade the question and you then told a lie," he said.

    Mr Wong denied he had told a lie.

    Mr Wong was later asked if he had ever approached Mr Huang for a donation or contribution to the Labor Party.

    "Oh, yes," he said.

    The inquiry was presented evidence that Mr Wong allegedly prepared a budget assuming the head table, which usually had no fee, would garner $100,000 for the March 12 fundraiser.

    RELATED ARTICLE
    Former Labor Senator Sam Dastyari arrives at the ICAC hearing on Thursday.
    LABOR IN TURMOIL
    Dastyari, ICAC and the Chinese 'agent of influence'
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    Within half an hour Mr Wong had twice been accused of giving false evidence to the ICAC, which is investigating an alleged scheme by NSW Labor to circumvent the state's donation laws.

    A dozen "straw donors" were allegedly used to disguise Mr Huang’s illegal cash donation. Mr Huang was barred from Australia on character grounds earlier this year.

    Former Labor senator Sam Dastyari previously told the ICAC he has concerns Mr Huang was working as an "agent of influence" for the Chinese government.

    Mr Wong replaced Eric Roozendaal in the NSW Legislative Council in 2013. Mr Roozendaal then took a job with Mr Huang's property development business Yuhu Group, the inquiry heard.

    NSW Labor boss Kaila Murnain was suspended as general secretary on Wednesday night after revealing to the inquiry that she had been aware since 2016 Mr Huang was behind the big donation.

    Ms Murnain, who cried in giving evidence to the ICAC on Thursday, said she was told by Mr Wong in September 2016 that there were serious issues with the Chinese Friends of Labor fundraising tactics.

    She said she was told by a party lawyer to stay quiet about what she was told. The lawyer, Ian Robertson, is set to face the ICAC next week along with Mr Wong and Ms Murnain.

    A guest list from the March 2015 dinner was tendered to the inquiry on Friday listing now-NSW Labor leader Jodi McKay as expected to attend, however, Ms McKay's office said she was not there.

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  14. 717
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    Od. Need a powerful drug to lift this up

    Federal Labor has seized on Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe's latest warning that monetary policy may have reached its limit to urge the Morrison government to jolt the nation's economy back to life through taxpayer-funded infrastructure projects.

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/rba-in-fresh-push-for-policy-action-to-spur-global-economy-20190825-p52kgy.html

  15. 29.0k
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    New polling shows the Queensland Labor Government would lose the state election if it was (sic) held today. Sky NewsFourteen months ahead of the Queensland election, an exclusive Courier-Mail/YouGov poll has a devastating prediction for Annastacia Palaszczuk’s Labor Government. The poll revealed Labor has fallen behind the LNP on a two-party-preferred basis for the first time since May 2016.The survey of a thousand Queenslanders found Ms Palaszczuk slipped 13 percentage points as preferred premier to 34 per cent. She remains ahead of LNP leader Deb Frecklington on 29 per cent, but behind uncommitted voters at 37 per cent.There’s speculation Adani’s Carmichael coal mine and the integrity scandal engulfing the (Qld) government led to its negative polling.

  16. 29.0k
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    Ministers and staff charged taxpayers millions to travel the country during election campaign
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    By Michael Koziol and Eryk Bagshaw
    September 1, 2019 — 12.00am
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    Taxpayers copped millions of dollars in bills for flights, charters, hotels and luxury cars as politicians and their staff jetted around the country campaigning in the federal election.

    Ministers also kept charging taxpayers for travel right up to polling day, despite a convention that most expenses after the official campaign launches should be paid by the political party.

    Ministers spent millions travelling the country helping their leaders and MPs campaign in the federal election.
    Ministers spent millions travelling the country helping their leaders and MPs campaign in the federal election.CREDIT:ALEX ELLINGHAUSEN/DOMINIC LORRIMER

    One retiring cabinet minister - former indigenous affairs minister Nigel Scullion - racked up more than $80,000 in charter flights for "official duties" during the five-week campaign.

    Electoral law experts said the system created an unfair advantage for incumbent MPs and the major parties, but warned any move to ban taxpayer funding during campaigns would lead to greater reliance on big political donors.

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    The Sun-Herald and The Sunday Age analysed spending by cabinet ministers and shadow cabinet ministers during the campaign - excluding junior ministers and backbench MPs - based on official records released by the Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority.

    The records reveal that despite the government being in caretaker mode, cabinet ministers still claimed almost $550,000 in travel allowance, air fares and luxury car transport during the campaign period - for themselves alone.

    Shadow cabinet ministers claimed about $385,000 in similar expenses. Ministers usually travel with multiple staff such as media and policy advisers, meaning the true cost of those trips is likely to be many times higher.

    A detailed breakdown of staff campaign costs is not available. But across April, May and June, cabinet ministers' staff racked up nearly $5 million in travel expenses, and shadow ministers' staff had travel bills of about $1.6 million during that period.

    Those figures include travel costs for Prime Minister Scott Morrison and then opposition leader Bill Shorten's staff. But the figures do not include the cost of flying Mr Morrison and Mr Shorten around the country on the Air Force's VIP business jets during the campaign.

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    National Party ministers spent more than most, with the outgoing Mr Scullion racking up more than $100,000 in taxpayer-funded expenses during the campaign, including $80,000 in charter flights. He declined to comment.

    Agriculture Minister David Littleproud billed taxpayers more than $65,000 for travel during the campaign period, including $46,000 in charter flights around regional Queensland.

    But ministers who were under pressure in their own seats - such as Peter Dutton and Greg Hunt - stayed close to home to campaign, and recorded relatively little travel expenditure.

    New Labor leader Anthony Albanese was the opposition's biggest spender in the campaign, charging taxpayers $42,195 to travel the country as Labor's infrastructure spokesman. He was followed by then deputy leader Tanya Plibersek, whose bills totalled $36,800.

    The profligacy was not limited to the major parties, with Katter's Australian Party leader Bob Katter spending $60,000 on travel during the campaign, including $50,000 on charter flights.

    Former senator Fraser Anning, the far-right Queenslander who lost his seat, spent $11,250 on flights alone during the campaign, including trips to Melbourne, Perth and Adelaide.

    He spent another $3485 on flights after the election, while he was still a senator, including a trip to Melbourne and Hobart.

    The rules allow all MPs to claim travel expenses for parliamentary business, official duties, electorate duties and "party duties" (limited to conferences and executive meetings) right up until polling day.

    A long-standing convention provides that ministers do not claim travelling expenses between the Prime Minister's official campaign launch and election day.

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    Prime Minister Scott Morrison during the election campaign.
    EDITORIAL
    Taxpayers lumped with another joyless expenses joyride
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    However, travel for urgent cabinet meetings and "parliamentary business" is still allowed, and was used by many - but not all - ministers during the campaign.

    A high level guidance note issued before the campaign says MPs who are not recontesting the election should contact the IPEA for guidance on their expenses.

    Electoral law expert Graeme Orr at the University of Queensland said the rules enabled ministers and MPs to create "sham travel such as a faux meeting to justify an already-planned campaign trip".

    "It's an obvious issue with frontbenchers, who are the face of the parties," he said.

    "Before the last election this was aggravated by ministers inviting LNP candidates to hand out community grants, but not local ALP members."

    In one instance, Resources Minister Matt Canavan charged taxpayers $5500 for a return charter flight from Townsville to Collinsville for "electorate duties" during the campaign.

    A spokeswoman said Senator Canavan met with workers at the Collinsville mine, as well as businesses and the local council.

    Professor Orr said an option was to ban all taxpayer-funded travel once an election is called and the government is in caretaker mode. However, he warned this would force the major parties to rely more heavily on big donors, and push travel forward to before an election.

    University of NSW constitutional law professor George Williams said the current system was "convenient" for politicians, providing "rules that benefit them while still giving them a chance to fight each other".

    "The people who designed the system are our politicians so it's no surprise that there is a self-serving aspect," he said.

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    POLITICAL EXPENSES
    LIBERAL PARTY
    ALP
    SCOTT MORRISON
    BILL SHORTEN
    NIGEL SCULLION
    Michael Koziol
    Michael Koziol
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    Michael Koziol is a political correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

  17. 29.0k
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    New polling shows the Queensland Labor Government would lose the state election if it was (sic) held today. Sky NewsFourteen months ahead of the Queensland election, an exclusive Courier-Mail/YouGov poll has a devastating prediction for Annastacia Palaszczuk’s Labor Government. The poll revealed Labor has fallen behind the LNP on a two-party-preferred basis for the first time since May 2016.The survey of a thousand Queenslanders found Ms Palaszczuk slipped 13 percentage points as preferred premier to 34 per cent. She remains ahead of LNP leader Deb Frecklington on 29 per cent, but behind uncommitted voters at 37 per cent.There’s speculation Adani’s Carmichael coal mine and the integrity scandal engulfing the (Qld) government led to its negative polling.

  18. 5.5k
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    The unemployed who voted for the LNP at the last election will all find it a lot harder to get the dole soon , despite record high unemployment and underemployment the government wants to test job seekers for illegal drugs as a means to deny Australians their social security entitlements , Australia's crime rate will skyrocket and thousands women will become prostitutes if Morrisons despicable legislation passes the senate.

    1 like
  19. 14.8k
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    I very much doubt that any unemployed voted for the LNP, the unemployed are Labour voters.

    1 like
  20. 29.0k
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    Jackie Trad in the clear over house buy
    Queensland Deputy Premier Jackie Trad has been stripped of responsibility for the state's biggest infrastructure project, the $5.4 billion Cross River Rail, despite being cleared of corruption by the state's Crime and Corruption Commission.
    After months of damaging claims over integrity issues, the Palaszczuk government received a circuit-breaker on Friday when the CCC announced it would not launch a formal investigation over Ms Trad's purchase of an investment property, which she did not promptly declare to Parliament.
    The CCC said it found no "reasonable" evidence of corruption over the $700,000 house purchase,which is expected to increase in value because it was near the Cross River Rail project, which was being overseen by Ms Trad.
    But the corruption watchdog did recommend improvements to cabinet's decision-making processes and areas for legislative reform to reduce corruption risks.
    While Ms Trad is in the clear from the state's corruption watchdog, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk dished out her own punishment by stripping the Deputy Premier of her responsibilities for Cross River Rail, which will be handed to Tourism Industry and Innovation Minister Kate Jones.
    Ms Palaszczuk also announced her chief-of-staff David Barbagallo, who has been embroiled in his own integrity issues over family business interests, will resign - a year out from the next state election.
    But despite the slap over the wrist by the Premier, Ms Trad will be acting premier when Ms Palaszczuk heads to Europe on Saturday.
    Ms Trad said she was relieved to be cleared of claims of dishonesty and corruption by the CCC, but acknowledged she failed to properly declare the house purchase.
    "It doesn't change I made a mistake. The Premier is right to expect the highest standards," she said.
    "Having made that mistake, having put the Premier and my colleagues in that position, and also I think giving rise to concerns from Queenslanders, I'm deeply disappointed and I'm disappointed in myself and very sorry for that."
    A formal investigation by the CCC would have forced Ms Trad, who is also treasurer, to step aside from all her ministerial duties.
    The CCC received an initial complaint on July 18 containing allegations of corruption about the purchase of the three-bedroom home in Brisbane's southern suburbs. The investment property was bought via a family investment vehicle in March.
    The Liberal National Party opposition claimed Ms Trad and her husband would have benefited from the house purchase in Woolloongabba given it was close to the existing Park Road train station and future Boggo Road station for the Cross River Rail - a project that has been on the drawing board for the past 10 years.
    The project was also near the new Inner City South State Secondary College in Ms Trad's South Brisbane electorate.
    But after completing its assessment it decided not to proceed to a formal investigation.
    "Based on the information obtained and assessed by the CCC, no evidence or information was identified that supported a reasonable suspicion of corrupt conduct as defined in Section 15 of the Crime and Corruption Act 2001," the CCC said in a statement.
    "The jurisdiction of the CCC to investigate suspected corrupt conduct by elected officials is limited to circumstances where the alleged conduct would, if proved, amount to a criminal offence.
    "The CCC's assessment did not identify evidence of information suggesting a criminal offence had been committed."
    The CCC did make five recommendations to reduce corruption risks in parliament.
    But Opposition Leader Deb Frecklington said Ms Palaszczuk should sack Ms Trad because she broke the Queensland Cabinet Handbook and the Queensland Ministerial Handbook rules.
    "Jackie Trad clearly broke those rules. It is up to Annastacia Palaszczuk to enforce those rules," Ms Frecklington said on Friday.
    "The only job Jackie Trad deserves is backbencher. Jackie Trad should be sacked."
    The ambitious and talented Ms Trad, the leader of the dominant Left faction in Queensland, has lost some political bark during the CCC process.
    She did not do herself any favour by not promptly declaring the house purchase to state Parliament's pecuniary interest register. She also called the CCC chairman, Alan MacSporran, during the assessment process.
    Ms Trad also said she would sell the $700,000 house for the same price she purchased it. But it has yet to have been sold.

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